Tag: Julia Child

French Chicken Stew (Coq au Vin)

French Chicken Stew (Coq au Vin)

This past fall I finally tried my hand at making French Chicken Stew, otherwise known by some as Coq au Vin. Coq au Vin was first made popular by Julia Child in her cookbook, Mastering the Art of French Cooking.

Beef Bourguignon – French Beef Stew

Beef Bourguignon – French Beef Stew

Here’s my take on Julia Child’s recipe for Beef Bourguignon – French Beef Stew. It’s so delicious. Don’t be intimidated by the long list of ingredients and instructions. It’s worth the effort and is the perfect way to spend a Saturday or Sunday afternoon! I 

Poached Eggs

Poached Eggs

I grew up using a metal poaching gadget that fit into a skillet. Here’s an old way that turns out delightful, creamy Poached Eggs. Thank you, Julia Child, for the lesson! I will never go back!

We love eggs at our house. In fact, we have them most every morning for breakfast. Sometimes we change things up with oatmeal. But not often. And why not? They are low-carb, low-calorie, a good source of protein, inexpensive, and they help raise your “good” cholesterol.

Plus there are so many ways to make eggs. Scrambled, Hard or Over-Easy, in a casserole, a quiche, in an omelet or as a Frittata. Serve them with ham, or sausage, or with pancakes. So many variations and they all taste wonderful! Who could get bored!

A few tips when making Poached Eggs:

  1. Spray your pan with cooking spray. I found that it helps with clean-up. Otherwise, the egg white sticks to the pan and very difficult to scrub off. Lesson learned. Always spray your pan when you make poached eggs.
  2. If you don’t raise your own chickens and have fresh eggs, or are unable to buy them, add a little vinegar to the water. It will help your eggs stay together and not spread out in a very ugly mess. Vinegar works. Trust me. And it doesn’t alter the final taste.
  3. Crack the eggs into a small bowl and then slip the eggs directly into the water, close to the water. It helps keep the egg together.
  4. Allow the eggs to float to the top before trying to turn them. Then let them cook for the length of time you prefer your yolks to be cooked. 4-6 minutes is a good amount of time.
  5. Be sure to place the cooked eggs on a paper towel to drain the excess water. Otherwise, you’ll have water pooling into your toast.

See More Breakfast Ideas HERE.

Poached Eggs

Poached Eggs

I grew up using a metal poaching gadget that fit into a skillet. Here's an old way that turns out delightful, creamy poached eggs. Thank you, Julia Child, for the lesson!
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Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: French
Keyword: Eggs
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 6 minutes
Total Time: 11 minutes
Servings: 2

Equipment

Cuisinart Cookware
All-Clad Cookware
Wire Strainer

Ingredients

Instructions

  • In a medium saucepan, bring water to a simmering boil, adjusting temperature as needed to maintain a light boil. If you don't have fresh eggs, it is recommended that you add vinegar to the water, to help keep the egg from scattering into a horrible mess.
  • Crack eggs, one-at-a-time, into a small bowl and carefully slip egg into the water. Repeat with remaining eggs. Allow to cook for 4-6 minutes, until you have the consistency of yolk that you desire. Once eggs float to the top, I like to turn them once with a wooden spoon.
  • Remove from water with a slotted spoon and allow to drain on a paper towel before serving. Season with sea salt and pepper. Serve with toast and bacon.

Notes

*I have found that if I spray the saucepan with a light cooking spray before adding the water, clean-up is swift and easy.
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